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The Inverse Cube Law for a Neodymium Dipole Magnet

PocketLab makes is quite easy to investigate and verify the inverse cube law for the magnetic field of a neodymium magnet as a function of distance from the magnet.  All that is needed in addition to The PocketLab is a centimeter ruler, small neodymium magnet, a small block of wood and a little double stick tape.  The photo below shows how the neodymium magnet is taped to the block of wood with the magnet located at the 10 cm mark on the NSTA ruler.  The height of the center of the magnet is at about the height of the circuit board inside of PocketLab.  The X on the front face of PocketLab is very close to the location of the magnetic field sensor inside of PocketLab, 0.5 cm from the left edge of Pocket Lab, in line with the Y-axis of PocketLab.

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The photo below shows the set up from above with the left edge of Pocket lab at the 15 cm mark.  The distance between the dipole and the sensor is therefore about 5.5 cm in this photo.

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In preparation for data collection, PocketLab is set to display magnetic field magnitude.  It is then moved far from the neodymium magnet and zeroed.  It is then placed at the 12 cm mark on the ruler, making the distance between magnet and sensor 2.5 cm.  After a few seconds, PocketLab is moved to the 13 cm mark, thus increasing the distance by 1 cm to 3.5 cm.  This process is continued through a distance of 8.5 cm.  The magnetic field magnitude can be read directly from the movie, shown below, at each of the known distances.

(Distance, magnetic field magnitude) data pairs are then entered into an Excel spreadsheet, and a chart of Magnetic Field vs. Distance is created.  The chart, shown below, appears to show some sort of an inverse relationship between magnetic field and distance.  The Excel "Add trendline" feature is then used and the "Power" regression fit is applied.  It is found that the power is -2.832, very close to the -3 expected for an inverse cube relationship.

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A copy of the Excel spreadsheet is included in the attachments for anyone interested in viewing it.

PocketLab on a Skier's Edge Machine

The PocketLab is an ideal device for measuring user performance for a variety of exercise equipment.  One example of such equipment is the Skier's Edge, whose company was founded in 1987.  This machine was designed for non-impact lateral conditioning that simulates the experience of downhill skiing.  The photo below shows the skiing machine.  The skier stands on the two black platforms, holding poles and moves the carriage back-and-forth on the curved white tracks.

SkiersEdgeFullCropped

A close-up view of the carriage in the photo below shows that a Pocket Lab has been mounted to the carriage with tabs provide in the PocketLab Maker Kit.  The carriage moves back-and-forth on the curved track in the XZ plane.  Therefore, the Y angular velocity would be a variable of interest to measure.  In addition, the X acceleration would be of interest as it is the major component of the back-and-forth motion provided by the skier's legs.

CloseUp

An iPhone snapshot of the data and video combined is shown below.  The acceleration graph (red) shows that the maximum acceleration is about 4g.  This is a true measure of the skier's power.  The angular velocity graph (blue) shows that the maximum angular velocity is about 75 degrees/sec.  From study of the time axis, both graphs show that the  back-and-forth movements of the skier has a frequency of about 75 per minute.  Increasing this rate while keeping the amplitude of the swings the same would suggest that the maximum g "force" could be increased for a more powerful skier.

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The action movie shown below includes an overlay of both the acceleration and angular velocity graphs, with maximum acceleration occurring at the ends of the back-and-forth motion, and maximum angular velocity occurring at the center of each swing.



PocketLab Investigation of Fuel Efficiency

With gas prices as high as they are and having a growing concern for the environment, Americans today are becoming conscious about things they can do to improve fuel efficiency.  Many realize that driving at the posted speed limits promotes both safety and reduces the rate at which fuel is consumed.  With these things in mind, some have purchased hybrid vehicles including the Toyota Prius, all-electric vehicles such as the Nissan LEAF, or range-extending vehicles such as the Chevy Volt.  Those with EV's soon realize that they get more miles per charge if they avoid driving at excessively high speeds on the open road.
 
With this background as a base, it would be very instructive if students could perform a laboratory investigation that would provide a quantitative relationship between distance per unit of fuel consumed (a measure of efficiency) and speed.  One way to accomplish this is by investigating these factors using an N-scale electric train set, such as those sold by Bachman for around $100, and commonly available in toy and hobby stores.  In this case, fuel is the unit of electrical energy, i.e. the kilowatt-hour (kWh), or on the scale of a hobby train, more appropriately the watt-second (W-s).  The picture below shows a train set, with a power supply providing the electrical power to run the train,  The power supply provides readings for voltage (V) in volts and current (I) in amps, from which power can be calculated by the product VI.  A meter stick is used to measure the diameter of the circular train track, from which the radius is found to be 0.285 m.  PocketLab is mounted to the top of the engine using tabs that come with the PocketLab Maker Kit.
Setup (2)
Starting with a low voltage, the train was allowed to run for about one lap.  This process was repeated for a sequence of voltages to slightly above the train manufacture's recommended limit of 16 volts.  Voltages can be read from the video.  PocketLab was set to provide angular acceleration.  With PocketLab mounted on the engine with the train moving in the XY plane, Z angular acceleration (shown in green in the video) is the variable of interest, telling us the number of degrees per second that the train revolves on its circular track.  It is important to make sure that angular acceleration is zeroed prior to capturing data and video with the PocketLab app.
The image shown below contains a graph of Z angular velocity vs. time from data produced by the PocketLab app.  The graph was obtained by importing data from the PocketLab app into Logger Pro, an exceptional educational scientific analysis software from Vernier Software & Technology (vernier.com).  The statistical analysis capability of Logger Pro is used to obtain mean angular velocity for each of the voltage steps during the experiment.  This is an extremely useful capability as the angular acceleration does vary a fair amount at each step level.  For example, the graph shows that the mean Z angular velocity for the second voltage step was 32.59 degrees/s. The step nature of the Logger Pro chart is a result of the voltage being increased to a new level after a few laps have been made by the train at a given voltage.
logger
The Microsoft Excel table below summarizes all of the raw data as well as come calculated columns containing power, period, speed, energy per lap, and efficiency.  A copy of the Microsoft Excel file is attached so that you can look at the formulas used in these calcualted columns.  Power is voltage times current (P= VI).  Period is 360/angular velocity.  Speed is 2*Pi*R / period.  The energy per lap in W-s is power multiplied by period.  Efficiency in Laps per W-s is the reciprocal of Energy per lap.  Therefore, efficiency for our N-scale train is measured in laps per W-s.  This is analogous to mpg for a traditional gas consuming car, or to miles per charge or miles per kWh for an EV.
datasheetexcel
The Microsoft Excel table below summarizes all of the raw data as well as come calculated columns containing power, period, speed, energy per lap, and efficiency.  A copy of the Microsoft Excel file is attached so that you can look at the formulas used in these calcualted columns.  Power is voltage times current (P= VI).  Period is 360/angular velocity.  Speed is 2*Pi*R / period.  The energy per lap in W-s is power multiplied by period.  Efficiency in Laps per W-s is the reciprocal of Energy per lap.  Therefore, efficiency for our N-scale train is measured in laps per W-s.  This is analogous to mpg for a traditional gas consuming car, or to miles per charge or miles per kWh for an EV.
graph (1)
Questions for Students:
 
1.  Why is the efficiency of the train so low at low speeds?
 
2.  What are some possible explanations for the train's efficiency dropping after reaching the speed of peak efficiency?
 
3.  Considering a moving automobile as an analogy, (1) What is the efficiency of a car when it is at rest in a traffic jam and why?  (2) What factors reduce the efficiency of a typical car at very high speeds?

Using PocketLab to Investigate Newton's Law of Cooling

In this experiment students will use PocketLab to collect data related to the cooling of a container of hot water as time goes on.  Sir Isaac Newton modeled this process under the assumption that the rate at which heat moves from one object to another is proportional to the difference in temperature between the two objects, i.e., the cooling rate = -k*TempDiff.  In the case of this experiment, the two objects are water and air. Newton showed that TempDiff = To * exp(-kt), where TempDiff is the temperature difference at time t and To is the temperature difference at time zero.
 
In order to do this experiment on Newton's Law of Cooling using PocketLab, we need to wrap PocketLab securely in a plastic sandwich bag, so that water cannot leak into the bag and damage PocketLab.  The figure below shows how this can be done.  PocketLab is wrapped and taped tightly in the plastic bag.  It is immersed in water briefly to make sure that it has no leaks.  A piece of Velcro is attached as shown on the right of the figure.  The purpose of this Velcro is so that PocketLab can then be secured to the bottom of the hot water container without floating.
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The figure below shows the complete apparatus setup.  PocketLab has been placed and secured to the bottom of a small bottle not much larger than PocketLab.  The bottle needs to be as small as possible, for even a small amount of water in the bottle can take several hours to cool back down to near room temperature again.  The bottle used by the author required only about 70 ml of water, but data was collected for close to two hours.  The room temperature is noted, hot tap water is poured into the bottle until it is full, and data collection is initiated with PocketLab set to record temperature once each second.  The purpose of the optional small block of foam is to insulate the bottle some from the table top, resulting in most heat loss into the air.
PLinWaterBottle
The image shown below contains a graph of temperature from data produced by the PocketLab app.  A red dot is shown once for every two-hundred data points.  The graph was obtained by importing data from the PocketLab app into Logger Pro, an exceptional educational scientific analysis software from Vernier Software & Technology (vernier.com).  The initial rise in temperature is due to the time required for PocketLab to warm up as heat is transferred from the water to PocketLab.  Once equilibrium has been reached, the system begins to show cooling as heat is transferred to the surrounding air at room temperature.  The cooling appears to be negative exponential. The model fit Temperature = A*exp(-Cx)+B was then applied to the region of the graph shown in dark gray.  The correlation coefficient of 1.000 clearly indicates an excellent fit.  x corresponds to time in Newton's equation, A to the initial temperature difference, C to the constant of proportionality k, and B to room temperature.
tempgraph

PocketLab on an Oscillating Cart

An oscillating cart with a PocketLab provides an interesting way to study Newton's Second Law of Motion as well as some principles of damped harmonic motion.  The apparatus setup is shown in the figure below.  The small dynamics cart that can quickly be made from parts included in the PocketLab Maker Kit is shown in its equilibrium position.  Rubber bands are attached to each side of the cart and to two ring stands weighted down with some heavy books.  It is best to use rubber bands that provide as small Newton/meter as possible.  PocketLab is attached to the cart with its x-axis parallel to the rubber bands.

setup (1)

The close-up in the figure below shows that two small pieces of wire are threaded into holes in the cart with the rubber bands attached.  The ends of each wire are twisted together to tighten the rubber band on the cart.

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The movie below shows a typical run, with 20 data points per second and acceleration selected in single-graph mode.  The red trace on the graph is the acceleration of interest, namely acceleration in the X-direction.  The blue and green traces, representing acceleration in the Y and Z directions, are quite erratic due to slight jiggling of the cart, and are not of interest here.  The red curve shows a very regular pattern, in which it can be observed that the magnitude of the acceleration is greatest when the cart is at each end of its swing and zero in the center of the swing.  It is also noted that the magnitude of the acceleration decreases with time in a pattern that suggests exponential decay.

The image shown below contains a graph of x acceleration from data produced by the PocketLab app.  The graph was obtained by importing data from the PocketLab app into Logger Pro, an exceptional educational scientific analysis software from Vernier Software & Technology (vernier.com).  A model involving the sine function and exponential function was created.  It is seen that the model (the black curve) follows the red acceleration X curve very well.

graph

Students can therefore conclude that this oscillating cart has a negative exponential decay with individual cycles characteristic of the sine function.  There are two constants of particular interest in the model equation shown in the gif image: Accel X = A*exp(-B*x)*sin(Cx+D)+E.  The constant C in the fit is 2*Pi/Period, from which we see that the period is 2*Pi/D = 2*Pi/11.61 = 0.54 s.  This agrees very well with the period obtained by direct observation of the graph.  The constant B in the fit is the reciprocal of the so-called lifetime.  Any exponential decay is characterized by its lifetime, which is the amount of time required for the amplitude to decay to 37% of its initial value.
 
By loading the cart with different masses and collecting PocketLab data on the resulting accelerations, students should be able to verify Newton's Second Law of Motion (Fnet = ma), showing that acceleration is inversely proportion to mass if the net force is held constant.
 
This experiment also provides a nice way to determine the period when the period of the oscillation is quite small, and difficult to measure with a stop watch.

Negative Exponentially Damped Harmonic Motion from a PocketLab Pendulum

This experiment allows one to do a quantitative investigation of the damped harmonic motion of a swinging pendulum.  The pendulum is a piece of wood about a yard long from a Michael's hobby shop one end of which has been attached to a PocketLab by a rubber band.  The other end is taped to the top of a doorway, allowing the resultant pendulum to swing back-and-forth as shown in the image below.

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The y-axis is perpendicular to the XZ plane of the swinging pendulum.  Therefore, the main item of interest is the magnitude of the angular velocity vector in the Y direction (shown as a blue curve in the movie).

The image shown below contains a graph of the Y angular velocity (shown in blue).  The X and Z angular velocities (shown in red and green in the video, respectively) are small and erratic due to slight wobble in the swinging pendulum and are not included in the graph.  The graph was obtained by importing the data from the PocketLab app into Logger Pro, an exceptional educational scientific analysis software from Vernier Software & Technology (vernier.com).  A model involving the sine function and the exponential function was created. It is seen that the model (the black curve) follows the blue angular velocity curve very well.

dhm (1)

Students can therefore conclude that this damped harmonic motion has a negative exponential decay with individual cycles characteristic of the sine function.  There are two constants of particular interest in the model equation shown in the gif image: Angular Velocity = A*exp(-C*x)*sin(Dx+E)+B.  The constant D in the fit is 2*Pi/Period, from which we see that the period is 2*Pi/D = 2*Pi/3.657 = 1.72 s.  This agrees very well with the period obtained by direct observation of the graph.  The constant C in the fit is the reciprocal of the so-called lifetime.  Any exponential decay is characterized by its lifetime, which is the amount of time required for the amplitude to decay to 37% of its initial value.
 
You will note from observing the movie that the angular Y velocity is zero when the pendulum is at the two ends of its swing, and is a maximum at the middle of the swing, both of which are expected.  This is easier to see if you view the movie frame by frame.

PocketLab on a Turnatable

Centripetal acceleration with varying angular velocity. 



Centripetal acceleration with varying radius. 

Video by Rich Born
Associate Professor Emeritus
Northern Illinois University

For more information on Rich's turntable experiment, see his post "Using a 33-45-78 Turntable to Show that Centripetal Acceleration is Proportional to the Square of the Velocity and Inversely Proportional to Radius" in the User Generated Curriculum Forum page: http://support.thepocketlab.co...oportional-to-radius

Using a 33-45-78 Turntable to Show that Centripetal Acceleration is Proportional to the Square of the Velocity and Inversely Proportional to Radius

PocketLab in conjunction with a 33-45-78 RPM turntable is an ideal setup for studying centripetal acceleration.  There are two videos that can be found in the Videos page of this web site.  They show that (1)  keeping radius constant implies that centripetal acceleration is proportional to the square of the velocity, (2) keeping velocity constant while varying the radius implies that centripetal acceleration is inversely proportional to the radius.



The PocketLab is placed in its silicone protective case to provide greater friction so that it doesn't slide off the turntable.  Y is toward the center of the turntable, and X is in the direction of rotational motion of the turntable. Single-graph mode is used with acceleration selected to be graphed.



From the accel X data in the videos students can then use Excel, Google Sheets, or any other analysis software to make graphs of (1) accel X vs. velocity-squared, and (2) accel X vs. the reciprocal of the radius.  Both of the graphs should be pretty close to straight lines, giving support for the desired outcomes.



PocketLab Maker Kit Guidelines

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Here you will find guidelines for the investigations you can do with the PocketLab Maker Kit.

Currently we have in-depth, step-by-step instructions for two activities, the PocketLab Maker Cart, and the Magnetic Minesweeper Lab. More in-depth instructions for the other activities are coming soon, but for now, see the guidelines below and stay tuned for updates. 



PocketLab Maker Cart

See the full step-by-step guide here



PocketLab Smart Rubber Band and Dynamics Cart



Magnetometer Minesweeper

See the full step-by-step guide here 



Newton's Second Law: Cart and Pulley

Follow the curriculum guide here 

Make it with the PocketLab Maker Kit:

  1. Build the PocketLab cart shown in the PocketLab Maker Cart instructions.
  2. Clip the binder clip to the edge of a table. Don’t fold the metal pieces of the binder clip back, leave them hanging off the edge of the table.
  3. Feed the string through the metal pieces of the binder clip. Attach one end of the string to the PocketLab cart. Place the cart on the table. Attach the other end of the string to a small weight. Let the small weight hang off the edge of the table.
  4. The binder clip will act as a pulley to guide the string as it pulls the cart.



How do you Measure Weight with just a Plastic Bag

Follow the curriculum guide here



Ratios and Proportions with a Plastic Bag?

Follow the curriculum guide here


Take a hike in Altitude

Follow the curriculum guide here 



Simple Pendulum Motion

Follow the curriculum guide here

Make it with the PocketLab Maker Kit:

  1. Unfold the folding ruler to its full length.
  2. Lay the ruler flat and velcro or tape the PocketLab so it is flush with the end of the ruler opposite the end with the hole. The PocketLab should take up about three of the folding panels on the ruler.
  3. Hold the panel of the ruler opposite the PocketLab. The “hinge” on the 1 inch mark will give you your longest pendulum. Swing the PocketLab like a pendulum about the 1 inch “hinge.”
  4. You can change the length of the pendulum by folding the ruler to different “hinges” closer and closer to the PocketLab at the bottom.
  5. Using the acceleration graph, investigate how changing the length of the pendulum affects the period of the pendulum.
  6. For a better pendulum, use the two magnets as a counter balance to the PocketLab. Tape them to the opposite side of the ruler.


What is temperature?

Follow the curriculum guide here



Saving Energy with Curtains

Follow the curriculum guide here



The Great Soup Can Race!

Follow the curriculum guide here



Bungee Jumping

Follow the curriculum guide here

Make it with the PocketLab Maker Kit:

  1. Daisy chain the three colorful rubber bands together. This will be your “bungee cord.”
  2. Loop one end of the rubber band bungee cord through one of the attachments on the PocketLab’s protective silicone case, if you have one.

    If you don’t have a protective case, there are two attachments on either side of the PocketLab directly underneath the screws to the backplate. Attach the bungee cord to the PocketLab in one of two ways: 
    i) Loop a paperclip through one of the attachments and then loop the rubber band bungee cord to the paper clip.
    ii) Loop the rubber band bungee cord directly to the attachment. To do this, first remove the backplate with a small screwdriver. Next, loop the rubber band through the attachment when the backplate is removed. Finally, screw the backplate back on the PocketLab.

  3. Tape a doll or action figure to the PocketLab. This will be your “jumper.” A heavy doll or action figure is best. To add weight, tape pennies to the jumper. (For an extra challenge, design and build your own jumper out of cardboard and other household materials).
  4. Attach the bungee cord to the edge of a table, dresser, shelf, etc. Measure the acceleration of the jumper as it takes the plunge!
  5. Make adjustments to your setup by changing the weight of the jumper, the number of rubber bands, the height of the jump, the location of the jump, etc., to make the jump both safe and fun for your jumper.



What is a magnetometer?

Follow the curriculum guide



Trigonometry and the Angle of an Incline Plane

Follow the curriculum guide here 

For a video demonstration, click here



Ceiling Fan in Winter

Follow the curriculum guide here



The Angular Rotation Game

Follow the curriculum guide here



A Spinning Figure Skater and Angular Momentum

Follow the curriculum guide here



Moments of Inertia and the Physics of a Rotating Book

Follow the curriculum guide here

Make it with the PocketLab Maker Kit

  1. Use the cardboard box that the PocketLab Maker Kit was shipped in as your “book.”
  2. Tape the PocketLab to the inside center of the box. Orient the PocketLab as shown in the curriculum diagram.
  3. Rotate the “book” about each axis of the book as shown in the curriculum.
  4. Observe the differences in the moment of inertia as the “book” rotates about each axis by measuring the changes in the angular velocity.



The Angular Velocity of Rolling Object at Different Inclines

Follow the curriculum guide here



Measuring Speed and Graphing Position versus Time

Follow the curriculum guide here (Lessons 1 and 3)

Make it with the PocketLab Maker Kit

  1. Build the PocketLab cart shown in the PocketLab Maker Cart instructions. 
  2. Using the three magnets and a ruler or measuring tape, design a procedure to measure the speed of the cart over a short distance.
  3. Test your procedure for measuring speed in two ways:

    i) Push the cart at a constant speed with as little acceleration as possible. 
    ii)Power the cart with a rubber band, as shown in the PocketLab Maker Cart instructions.

  4. Did you notice a difference in the data you collected between Test A and Test B?
  5. Explain how your procedure is related to the definition of speed and why you were able to estimate the speed of the cart with your procedure in Test A and Test B.
  6. See if you can answer the other “Analysis” questions from the two lessons in the PocketLab Curriculum.



Crash Cushion Investigation:

Follow the curriculum guide here 

Make it with the PocketLab Maker Kit:

  1. Build the PocketLab Maker cart. See instructions here: http://support.thepocketlab.co...uilding-instructions
  2. Read through the procedures in the curriculum.
  3. Conduct the Balloon Crash Cushion investigation described below:

Balloon Crash Cushion
Before designing a custom crash cushion, use the balloon in the kit as a cushion to get some ideas for your design.

  1. Collect data from a control crash as described in the procedures of the curriculum.
  2. Blow up the balloon all the way, but don’t tie it off. Close the balloon by clipping the end with the binder clip.
  3. Crash your cart into the fully inflated balloon and record the acceleration data at impact. Conduct at least five trials.
  4. Deflate the balloon so it is about halfway inflated by releasing some air with the binder clip.
  5. Crash your cart into the balloon again and record the acceleration data at impact. Conduct at least five trials.
  6. Deflate the balloon so it is about one-quarter inflated by releasing more air with the binder clip.
  7. Crash your cart into the balloon again and record the acceleration data at impact. Conduct at least five trials.
  8. Which version of the balloon was the best crash cushion? Why? Was it different than what you expected?

Design your own Crash Cushion
Thinking about what you learned after testing the different balloon crash cushions, design and build your own crash cushion by following the procedures in the curriculum.



PocketLab Earthquake Machine

Curriculum guide is coming soon, but read about the activity on our blog by clicking here

Make it with the PocketLab Maker Kit:

  1. Attach the PocketLab to the top of an empty box (the PocketLab box will work if you haven’t already used it for the PocketLab Maker Cart) and lay it flat on a table.
  2. Attach one of the colorful rubber bands to one end of the box.
  3. Attach the other end of the rubber band to the string.
  4. Loop the other end of the string around a pencil/straw or some type of spool.
  5. As you rotate the pencil/straw/spool, the string will pull on the rubber band. The friction between the table and the box will hold the box in place. The rubber band will stretch and build up elastic potential energy while trying to move the box. Eventually the box will shift suddenly and the elastic potential energy in the rubber band will transfer to the kinetic energy of the moving box.
  6. Measure this change in movement with the acceleration graph.
  7. How does this procedure model an Earthquake?
  8. Change the surface that the box has to move across. This will change the amount of friction holding the box in place. Use the sandpaper in the maker kit to model greater friction.
  9. How does the change in friction affect the model? How is the acceleration of the moving box affected? What does this tell you about how the change in friction affects the elastic potential energy in the rubber band and the kinetic energy of the moving box? What does this tell you about different types of Earthquakes and fault lines?



How to build a Seismometer

Follow the curriculum guide here

Make it with the PocketLab Maker Kit:

To make a simpler version of the seismograph from the curriculum link, follow the procedures below:

  1. Attach one of the magnets to the string.
  2. Hang the string from the edge of a table to create a pendulum.
  3. Place the PocketLab directly underneath the magnet.
  4. Observe the period of the pendulum/seismograph with the magnetic field graph. Allow the pendulum/seismograph to settle.
  5. Try different things to get a significant reading from the seismograph. Try jumping next to the seismograph, banging the table, walking by it, etc.
  6. Can you tell the difference between a dog/cat walking by the seismograph and a person walking by? What about a person walking normally versus tip-toeing?
  7. How can you use the seismograph to tell if your little sibling snuck into your room?



ScratchX Visual Programming and PocketLab on Windows 10

For instructions using PocketLab with Scratch follow this link to our Scratch forum



PocketLab Maker Kit: Cart Building Instructions

PMK Cart 1

The PocketLab Maker Cart

1. You will reuse one of the PocketLab boxes to build the PocketLab Maker Cart. Empty the contents of one of the boxes included in the kit. 

PMK Cart 2

2. Flatten out the folds of the box so the box is flat. 

PMK Cart 3

3. Fold up two of the box flaps so that the box looks like the picture below. Using scissors, cut along the black markings in each of the four corners. Keep the side flap folded over so that you cut through two layers of the box.

PMK Cart 4

4. Cut out the square shown in the picture below. 

PMK Cart 5

5. Cut one of the straws to 4.5 inches in length. Unfold the box flaps. Slide the straw through the seams that you created by cutting the box. 

PMK Cart 6

6. Cut two pieces of the straw to 1.5 inches in length. Slide one piece of straw under each seam on the opposite side of the box. 

PMK Cart 7

7. Slide the wooden dowels through the straws. The straws will serve as the bearings for the cart and the dowels will be the cart axles. 

PMK Cart 8

8. Fold up the front and back of the box. Fold the small flaps so that they are 90 degrees to the front and back walls. Fold the side flaps over the top of the small flaps and then tuck it into the bottom of the box. 

PMK Cart 9PMK Cart 10

9. After you have folded the side flaps, the bottom of the box with the axles should look like the picture below. 

PMK Cart 11

10. Close the top lid. Tape the top lid shut so it does not pop open. 

PMK Cart 12

11. Tape the straw bearings in place. Make sure the straws extend past the outside of the box, so that the wheels do not rub against the box. Slide the red wheels onto the dowel axles as shown. 

PMK Cart 13

12. Your PocketLab Maker Cart should look like the picture below. You can use the PocketLab Maker Cart in this version for many experiments. If you want to turn the PocketLab Maker Cart into a rubber band cart, follow the additional instructions below. 

PMK Cart 14

The PocketLab Rubber Band Cart

13. Cut the loop of one of the colored rubber bands. Tape one end of the rubber band to the top and side of the Maker Cart as shown. 

PMK Cart 15

14. Turn the cart over and lay the rubber band along the bottom of the cart. Make sure that the rubber band comes across to the axle with the cut out underneath it. Cut the rubber band so that you have about 1 inch of length that extends past the wooden dowel. 

PMK Cart 16

15. Use the beige colored rubber bands to add tire treads to the red wheels. Add the rubber bands to the wheels that you will wind with the rubber band. This will help the cart get traction and move faster when the rubber band is released. PMK Cart 17PMK Cart 18

16. You can attach PocketLab to the top of the Maker Cart with tape or to the wheels with the adhesive Velcro strips. 

PMK Cart 19PMK Cart 20PMK Cart 21

17. To propel the cart, wind the rubber band around the rear axle. Hold the wheels until you're ready to release the cart. 

PMK Cart 22

PocketLab Maker Kit: Magnetic Minesweeper Building Instructions

PMK Minesweeper 01

In the Magnetic Minesweeper Lab, you will recreate the classic computer game Minesweeper in real life! Using PocketLab's magnetometer, you will try to discover hidden mines and mark their locations on a grid. You can do this lab with two people to create a Minesweeper competition. One partner hides mines in different grid locations while the other partner tries to locate the mines to not get blown up! 

Magnetic Minesweeper Setup Instructions

1. Print off two copies of the minesweeper grid. Make sure that your printer settings are set to "Actual Size" so that the grid is not scaled. (At the bottom of this post click, next to "attachments," click "show" and download the file titled "Pocketlab_minesweeper.pdf")

2. Using scissors, cut the first grid around the outside of the image. Cut the second grid on the perimeter of the 12 squares. This will cut off part of the graphics so that the second grid will fit inside the Maker Kit box. 

PMK Minesweeper 02PMK Minesweeper 03PMK Minesweeper 04

3. Tape the smaller grid to the inside bottom of the Maker Kit box. 

PMK Minesweeper 05

4. Tape the larger grid to the top cover of the Maker Kit box. You're now ready to investigate the Magnetic Minesweeper Lab! 

Magnetic Minesweeper Lab Instructions

1. Connect the PocketLab sensor and app. Select the Magnetic Field Magnitude from the graph list. 

2. Place a magnet on the top grid of the box in one of the center squares. 

3. Place the PocketLab sensor on the lower left square. 

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4. On the PocketLab app screen, press the zero button to calibrate the Magnetic Field Magnitude graph. 

5. Move the PocketLab sensor to different squares and observe how the graph changes. What happens when the sensor gets closer to the magnet? What happens when the sensor moves from the left to the right of the magnet? 

6. Now that you are familiar with the Magnetic Field graph, put the magnet inside the box in the center of one of the squares. Close the lid of the box and then scan over the top grid with the PocketLab sensor. Slowly move the sensor left and right or up and down across the grids. What happens when the PocketLab sensor is on the grid directly on top of the magnet? What happens when you move the PocketLab to the left of squares to the left of the magnet?

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7. Have your lab partner, friend, or parent place the magnet to a different grid in the box without you seeing where the magnet is placed. Cover your eyes or turn your head, so that you do not know where the magnet is located. Have your lab partner close the lid.

8. Scan up and down and left to right over the top grid with the PocketLab sensor. Using your observations from earlier, predict where you think the magnet is located. When you have a good prediction, mark an X on the grid where you think the magnet is located.

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9. Open up the box and see if your prediction is correct. 

10. Switch roles so that you hide the magnet and your lab partner tries to predict the location. 

11. For a more difficult challenge, place two magnets inside the box and try to find both locations. 

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Myriad Sensors, Inc., working with Google to develop PocketLab support for the Science Journal Android App

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. - May 20, 2016 - PRLog -- Myriad Sensors, Inc., the maker of PocketLab educational sensors, is working with Google's Making & Science initiative to support wirelessly streaming real time PocketLab sensor data to the Science Journal Android app. PocketLab is a wireless multi-sensor for engaging in hands-on science learning. All PocketLab users will be able to use their devices with the Science Journal digital science notebook. Timing for the support of Science Journal is fall 2016.

"We're happy to be working with PocketLab on sensors that could augment Science Journal", said Jen Phillips of Google's Making & Science team. "We like PocketLab because it's easy to use and can help inspire future scientists and makers."

Myriad Sensors has sold thousands of PocketLabs in over 40 countries since introducing on Kickstarter in July of last year. Fully loaded with five embedded sensors, PocketLab collects and transmits experimental data in real-time to tablets, smartphones, Chromebooks,and PCs. Attach PocketLab to a rocket and measure launch acceleration, put it inside a football and measure the angular velocity of a spiral throw, take it on a long hike and measure changes in altitude-with PocketLab science exploration is endless.

"Learning through hands on activities dramatically enhances science understanding. We designed PocketLab for intuitive use all the way from middle school science classes to graduate level engineering engineering courses", said Clifton Roozeboom, CEO and founder of Myriad Sensors. "If students can visualize how physics concepts are at work in fun activities, they can see the relevance and meaning to STEM education."

PocketLab is being adopted rapidly because it is the first such tool that combines five independent sensors into a small, lightweight package, with one button operation, and does this at a cost that is ten times less than competitive sensor bundles.

"PocketLab enables intuitive exploration of science concepts in the real world and lowers technological barriers for using science equipment", said Dave Bakker, COO and co-founder of Myriad Sensors. "This gives more students, makers, and explorers the ability to use state-of-the-art sensors in their day to day hobbies, projects, and fun activities."

About

Myriad Sensors, Inc., located in Mountain View, California, is an angel funded start up company that is the maker of the PocketLab educational sensor, and has won awards from Yale University, Stanford University, ProtoLabs, and the Intel Education Accelerator, and has received funding from Incubic Management, Intel Capital, and the National Science Foundation.

Media Inquiries

Clifton Roozeboom

Dave Bakker

505 Cypress Point Dr, #218

Mountain View, CA 94043

contact@thepocketlab.com

www.thepocketlab.com

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