Press Room

Did you ever wonder what happens to your packages during shipping?

Have you ever wondered what happens to your package after you put it in the mail? Does the package ever get hot, cold, wet, turned upside down, dropped off the back of a truck, or bitten by a dog while waiting on your doorstep? 

The PocketLab Team has been brainstorming citizen science experiments that users around the world can investigate with us. Join us in the first ever citizen science project that examines the mysteries of what happens to your package when it goes into the mail!

How are we going to do this massive experiment? We will use two new sensors,  PocketLab Voyager and PocketLab Weather currently on sale on Kickstarter, to measure temperature, humidity, altitude, and orientation. PocketLab Voyager and Weather can autonomously record data for months using the on-board memory.

Second, we will conduct this experiment while shipping the PocketLab sensors to Kickstarter customers around the globe. Finally, we will set up a Citizen Science website, where PocketLab users can upload data once they receive their package. Data will be anonymous and participation is of course optional.

Myriad Sensors, Inc., working with Google to develop PocketLab support for the Science Journal Android App

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. - May 20, 2016 - PRLog -- Myriad Sensors, Inc., the maker of PocketLab educational sensors, is working with Google's Making & Science initiative to support wirelessly streaming real time PocketLab sensor data to the Science Journal Android app. PocketLab is a wireless multi-sensor for engaging in hands-on science learning. All PocketLab users will be able to use their devices with the Science Journal digital science notebook. Timing for the support of Science Journal is fall 2016.

"We're happy to be working with PocketLab on sensors that could augment Science Journal", said Jen Phillips of Google's Making & Science team. "We like PocketLab because it's easy to use and can help inspire future scientists and makers."

Myriad Sensors has sold thousands of PocketLabs in over 40 countries since introducing on Kickstarter in July of last year. Fully loaded with five embedded sensors, PocketLab collects and transmits experimental data in real-time to tablets, smartphones, Chromebooks,and PCs. Attach PocketLab to a rocket and measure launch acceleration, put it inside a football and measure the angular velocity of a spiral throw, take it on a long hike and measure changes in altitude-with PocketLab science exploration is endless.

"Learning through hands on activities dramatically enhances science understanding. We designed PocketLab for intuitive use all the way from middle school science classes to graduate level engineering engineering courses", said Clifton Roozeboom, CEO and founder of Myriad Sensors. "If students can visualize how physics concepts are at work in fun activities, they can see the relevance and meaning to STEM education."

PocketLab is being adopted rapidly because it is the first such tool that combines five independent sensors into a small, lightweight package, with one button operation, and does this at a cost that is ten times less than competitive sensor bundles.

"PocketLab enables intuitive exploration of science concepts in the real world and lowers technological barriers for using science equipment", said Dave Bakker, COO and co-founder of Myriad Sensors. "This gives more students, makers, and explorers the ability to use state-of-the-art sensors in their day to day hobbies, projects, and fun activities."

About

Myriad Sensors, Inc., located in Mountain View, California, is an angel funded start up company that is the maker of the PocketLab educational sensor, and has won awards from Yale University, Stanford University, ProtoLabs, and the Intel Education Accelerator, and has received funding from Incubic Management, Intel Capital, and the National Science Foundation.

Media Inquiries

Clifton Roozeboom

Dave Bakker

505 Cypress Point Dr, #218

Mountain View, CA 94043

contact@thepocketlab.com

www.thepocketlab.com

About PocketLab



For press inquiries, please email contact@thepocketlab.com

 

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PocketLab believes anyone can be a scientist. PocketLab enables students, educators, and makers to explore the world around them. PocketLab brings science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) to life like never before possible.

 

The PocketLab is a wireless sensor that enables anyone to build a hands-on science experiment, anywhere they choose. Attach PocketLab to a model rocket to measure the launch acceleration and altitude. Take PocketLab skiing and measure altitude and acceleration while coasting down the slope. Optimize movement in a robotics project. Measure the magnetic field from an electric current or put it inside a football and measure the rotation of a spiral throw.

 

Over 3,000 users across 43 countries currently explore with PocketLab. Users are hobbyists and makers who build home projects and teachers and students in middle school, high school, and college-level STEM classrooms. No other product is as easy to use, durable, or inexpensive as PocketLab.



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Myriad Sensors began in 2013 by a group of Stanford University students working on a technology entrepreneurship course. The goal was to develop a working technology product that could fill a societal need. They combined their expertise in sensors, education and software and created a prototype of their first concept, the PocketLab. The team won the Grand Prize in the Yale School of Management Education Leadership Competition and Third Place at the Stanford BASES Competition. PocketLab also won the Cool Idea! Award from ProtoLabs and has been featured on education and technology sites like TechCrunch, Popular Science, Boing Boing, EdSurge, and IEEE Spectrum.

 

Clifton Roozeboom serves as CEO and led the development and testing of PocketLab. The company launched PocketLab on Kickstarter in March of 2015. Raising over over $114,000 in one month. PocketLab’s Kickstarter campaign was a huge success. Orders were fulfilled in August, and PocketLab is now selling and shipping live from its online store at http://thepocketlab.com/.

 

PocketLab’s user base is continuing to grow with over 1,500 users across 43 countries. School districts are making purchases, resellers are bundling it with other education products, and makers are finding unique use cases. Myriad Sensors supports current users with PocketLab curriculum, new app features, and customer service, while developing new products. An Application Program Interface (API) will open up the software for users to create new programs that utilize PocketLab as an input. The second generation hardware will feature more sensors and on-board memory to log data without being connected to a device via Bluetooth. Upcoming cloud software will foster collaboration on experiments between users and allow for more in-depth data analysis.

Myriad Sensors, Inc. wins $150,000 Small Business grant from National Science Foundation

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. - Dec. 8, 2015 - PRLog -- Myriad Sensors, Inc., the maker of the science educational sensor PocketLab, was awarded a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF).  Myriad Sensors will use the grant to develop new cloud software designed to bring science learning and discovery to people all over the world. The cloud software will allow users to collect, analyze, and collaborate on real-world experimental data.



Imagine a science student in San Francisco using a sensor to measure barometric pressure, transmitting the data wirelessly to an app for visualization, uploading the data to cloud software, then comparing it to similar data sources from other students in cities like Sacramento, New York, London, Singapore, or Rio de Janeiro. The student could analyze the data for patterns using the PocketLab web-based tools or collaborate on global weather research projects with users all over the world.



With the help of the NSF, these are the types of experiments that Myriad Sensors will make possible with its cloud software tool, called the Global Scientific Sensor Network (GSSN).



Myriad Sensors has sold thousands of their first product, PocketLab, since March of last year. PocketLab is a wireless multi-sensor, the size of a matchbox, for engaging in hands-on science learning. Fully loaded with five embedded sensors, PocketLab collects and transmits experimental data in real-time to tablets, smartphones, Chromebooks and PCs. With a splash- and shock-resistant case, PocketLab is designed to collect experimental data in the most rugged conditions. Attach PocketLab to a rocket and measure launch acceleration, put it inside a football and measure the angular velocity of a spiral throw, take it on a long hike and measure changes in altitude—with PocketLab science exploration is endless.



The GSSN will take data collected by devices like PocketLab to the next level. The web-based interface will give students, educators, and hobbyists the tools to analyze experimental sensor data, publish experiments and results, and collaborate on global science projects. The GSSN will be an especially powerful tool in science classrooms. A PocketLab, paired with the GSSN significantly lowers technological barriers for students conducting complex experiments. By introducing students to innovative and interactive lab equipment and engaging them in relevant science concepts, Myriad Sensors is working to help prepare students to solve emerging challenges in aeronautics, physics, connected Internet of Things (IoT), global climate, and other significant research disciplines.



The GSSN will be able to take data from multiple sources. Users can upload collected data using PocketLab and future Myriad Sensors hardware products, or they can upload collected data using sensors made by other companies. The GSSN will also collect and analyze data from large, publically available databases—allowing that student from San Francisco to also compare his or her data with that of the National Weather Service.



The SBIR grant comes on the heels of a recent investment by Intel Capital. As part of the investment from Intel Capital, Myriad Sensors took part in the inaugural Intel Education Accelerator, which they recently completed in December.



John Galvin, VP and General Manager of Intel Education Group said, “We believe [Myriad Sensors has] a very innovative and engaging education product and we look forward to helping them grow. Companies like Myriad Sensors are exactly why we decided to have an accelerator. They are bringing innovation to the classroom and how students can learn science.”



The team at Myriad Sensors is committed to continuing to provide ground breaking products in the ed-tech and maker spaces.



Media Inquiries

Clifton Roozeboom

Dave Bakker

505 Cypress Point Dr, #218

Mountain View, CA 94043

contact@thepocketlab.com

www.thepocketlab.com

Myriad Sensors, Inc., Joins Intel Education Accelerator

For Immediate Release

Mountain View, CA, September 10, 2015 -- Myriad Sensors, Inc., the maker of the PocketLab educational sensor, has been selected in the inaugural group of Intel’s Education Accelerator. PocketLab is a wireless multi-sensor for engaging in hands-on science learning. PocketLab enables intuitive exploration of science concepts in the real world and lowers technological barriers for using science equipment. The PocketLab sensor can measure parameters such as altitude and acceleration and wirelessly stream data to an Apple or Android smart phone, tablet, or Chromebook. PocketLab was introduced earlier this year on Kickstarter, and sold over 1,000 units to educators, parents, and makers worldwide. Intel’s Education Accelerator program is targeted towards funding and accelerating education-oriented technology start-ups. Eight companies have been selected from hundreds of business plans, and Myriad Sensors is proud to be among the ones selected.



PocketLab is innovative because it is the first such tool that combines five independent sensors into a small, lightweight package, with one button operation, and does this at a cost that is ten times less than competitive sensor bundles. This will give more students, makers, and explorers the ability to use state-of-the-art sensors in their day to day hobbies, projects, and fun activities.



“Learning through hands on activities dramatically enhances science understanding. We designed PocketLab for intuitive use from college level engineering engineering courses to middle school science classes”, says Clifton Roozeboom, CEO and founder of Myriad Sensors. “If students can visualize how physics concepts are at work in activities like gymnastics, they can see the relevance and meaning to STEM education.”



According to John Galvin, VP and General Manager of Intel Education Group, “We are thrilled to have Myriad Sensors as part of our first Education Accelerator. We believe they have a very innovative and engaging education product and we look forward to helping them grow. Companies like Myriad Sensors is exactly why we decided to have an accelerator. They are bringing innovation to the classroom and how students can learn science.”



About



Myriad Sensors, Inc., located in Mountain View, California, is an angel funded start up company that is the maker of the PocketLab educational sensor, and has won awards from Yale University, Stanford University, ProtoLabs, and have received funding from Incubic Management, and an investment from Intel Capital.





Media Inquiries

Clifton Roozeboom

Dave Bakker

505 Cypress Point Dr, #218

Mountain View, CA 94043

contact@thepocketlab.com

www.thepocketlab.com

PocketLab in the News

Boing Boing—PocketLab: A $100 Scientific Swiss Army Knife

http://boingboing.net/2015/10/...-100-scientific.html

 

IEEE Spectrum—Putting a Physics Lab in a Student’s Pocket

http://spectrum.ieee.org/view-...in-a-students-pocket

 

EdSurge – Inside the Eight Companies Selected for Intel’s Education Accelerator

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2...ducation-accelerator

 

Crowd Scene Podcast—Coming Soon From The Future! Clifton Roozeboom Explains how he Kickstarted his Amazing PocketLab

http://crowdsceneshow.com/2015...s-amazing-pocketlab/

 

Tech Crunch—PocketLab is Simplified Wireless Sensing for Science Class

http://techcrunch.com/2015/03/16/pocketlab/

 

Popular Science—Tiny Sensor Package Will Let Students Design Their Own Physics Experiements

http://www.popsci.com/tiny-sen...heir-own-experiments

 

Geek Wire – Meet PocketLab, the Little Science Lab that Goes Anywhere

http://www.geekwire.com/2015/m...-that-goes-anywhere/

 

Geek Times Russia – PocketLab – Like a Swiss Army Knife for Science

http://geektimes.ru/post/248874/

 

Texas Instruments blog – Stanford Student Creates Pocket-Size Science Lab

https://e2e.ti.com/blogs_/b/th...et-sized-science-lab

 

Fictiv Hardware Spotlight – Building Dreams: Insights on Becoming a Hardware CEO

https://www.fictiv.com/resourc...n=0311-hws-pocketlab

 

Ed Surge- Pocket Lab wins Yale Business Plan Competition

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2...ess-plan-competition

 

PocketLab wins BASES Social e-Challenge

https://stanfordbases.wordpres...allenge-infographic/

 

Product Specifications

Sensor hardware

-     Bluetooth 4.0 wireless connection

-     Approximately 150 ft wireless range

-     Approximately 80 hours of operation on one coin (CR2032) cell battery

-     Durable: can withstand 6 ft drop onto concrete surface

-     Dimensions: L 2.65 x W 0.65 x H 1.15 inches

 

Sensor specifications

-     Data rate: up to 33 samples/sec

-     Ability to record two sensor measurements simultaneously

-     Accelerometer: 8g range, 0.001 g resolution

-     Gyroscope: 2000 o/sec range, 1.0 deg/sec resolution

-     Magnetometer: 1000 uT range, 0.1 uT resolution

-     Pressure: 30 to 180 kPa range, 3 Pa (0.3 meters) resolution

-     Temperature: -20 to 70 oC range, 0.5 oC accuracy

 

App

-     iOS, Android, Windows 10, and Chromebook compatible

-     Mac support in development

-     Real-time data visualization and data recording

-     Export data as .csv file to Google Drive, Microsoft Excel, etc.

 

Cloud Software (in development)

-     Data storage from app

-     Ability to share data with lab group and classroom

-     Teacher can manage all devices in classroom

-     Data integration with Google Drive, Microsoft Excel, etc.

 

Curriculum

-     Open access to online experiments and demos

-     Over 35 Experiments covering a wide variety of topics and grade levels.

-     More curriculum in development aligned with Middle School and High School Next Generation Science Standards

Myriad Sensors Announces First Commercial Product Aimed at EdTech

Palo Alto, Cali. - March 10, 2015 -- Myriad Sensors, Inc. today announced the release of its premiere hardware and software product, the PocketLab, developed by co-founders Clifton Roozeboom and Adrian Albert. The PocketLab is the first in what will be a series of products developed by Myriad Sensors aimed at impacting the lives of hobbyists, makers and students around the world.

Despite being a newcomer in consumer goods, Myriad's first product packs a punch. Fully loaded  with six embedded sensors, a splash- and shock-resistant case and changeable batteries, this 1”x 3” gadget can hang with the toughest crowd. After watching early testers interact with the PocketLab in a number of settings, durability became the team’s number one priority.  

“In order for PocketLab to be useful, it needs to go where you go,” said Clif Roozeboom, Myriad Sensors CEO. “We wanted a rugged tool that can help you explore anywhere.”

“The original idea came from watching students struggle through difficult physics lessons and thinking there must be a way to make this more applicable to everyday life,” Roozeboom said. “What if we gave people a tool to explore on their own terms?”  

PocketLab can help students gather and manipulate data like acceleration, barometric pressure and magnetic field strength in real time, anywhere they choose.  

Everyone in Roozeboom’s life, from his lab mates, to his crossfit friends, to his father, has tried PocketLab and found new uses for it. For fitness enthusiasts, PocketLab is a way to detect minute changes in their bodies’ strength and ability levels. For techies, PocketLab enables them to record and manipulate data to answer a multitude of questions. Recently a beta tester for PocketLab used the acceleration and gyroscope sensors to optimize the throwing arm of a robot that went on to place in FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition in Science and Technology, a national competition encouraging innovation and entrepreneurship).  And for Roozeboom’s father? He uses it to tell when the grill is hot enough.  

Ready to grab one for yourself? The PocketLab is available for pre-order on Kickstarter on March 10, 2015. Although PocketLab will eventually retail for a little more than $100.00, the earlybird price provided through Kickstarter is $78.00.  

The team at Myriad Sensors is committed to providing worthwhile products in the EdTech space and hopes to branch into chemistry and earth science with a new product slated for release in early 2016. Among the functions to be added are new sensors and software to synchronize video and data streams.



About

Myriad Sensors, Inc., located in Mountain View, California, is an angel funded start up company that is the maker of the PocketLab educational sensor, and has won awards from Yale University, Stanford University, ProtoLabs, and the Intel Education Accelerator, and has received funding from Incubic Management, Intel Capital, and the National Science Foundation.

Media Inquiries

Clifton Roozeboom

Dave Bakker

505 Cypress Point Dr, #218

Mountain View, CA 94043

contact@thepocketlab.com

www.thepocketlab.com

 
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