Tagged With "temperature"

Topic

Using PocketLab to Investigate Newton's Law of Cooling

Rich ·
In this experiment students will use PocketLab to collect data related to the cooling of a container of hot water as time goes on. Sir Isaac Newton modeled this process under the assumption that the rate at which heat moves from one object to another is proportional to the difference in temperature between the two objects, i.e., the cooling rate = -k*TempDiff. In the case of this experiment, the two objects are water and air. Newton showed that TempDiff = To * exp(-kt), where TempDiff is the...
Topic

Temperature seems inaccurate

Bryan M. ·
Hello! I live in a hilly area, and tried to do a test measuring the temperature from an area of low elevation to a nearby high area. The temperature moved up and down predictably as I went, but later I noticed that all of the readings were at least 10 degrees F higher than they should be, based on a weather station I live next to, and my own memory of what 80 degrees feels like. Is there a way to re-calibrate the sensor, or does it need to sit in a place for a certain amount of time before...
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Re: Temperature seems inaccurate

Robby ·
Hi Bryan, Thanks so much for your question. The temperature sensor has a longer time constant than something like a probe, so it does take longer to "settle" on the correct temperature. My guess is that the PocketLab was inside a bag/pocket ahead of time and then never settled to the correct temperature before the data collection began. Also, when you were walking through the hilly area, where did you have the PocketLab? Even if the PocketLab was in your hand, your body heat could have kept...
Blog Post

Investigating Gay-Lussac's Law and Absolute Zero of Temperature with PocketLab and a Mason Jar

Rich ·
Gay-Lussac's Law states that when the volume of a container of gas is held constant, while the temperature of the gas is increased, then the pressure of the gas will also increase. In other words, pressure is directly proportional to the absolute temperature for a given mass of gas at constant volume. Although this is, strictly speaking, true only for an ideal gas, most gases that surround us behave much like an ideal gas. Even ordinary air, which is a mixture of gases, can behave like an...
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