Tagged With "Experiment"

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PocketLab Experiment on Centripetal Acceleration with a 3-speed Ceiling Fan

Rich ·
There are two approaches that the teacher can take to doing this experiment on centripetal acceleration with a three-speed ceiling fan and PocketLab. The first choice is for those with an available three-speed ceiling fan. In this case students can collect all data by actually performing the experiment themselves. The PocketLab should be mounted to one of the ceiling fan blades with a very strong double stick mounting tape. For safety, however, students should still wear goggles. The author...
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Investigating Ampere's Law for a Long Current Carrying Wire

Rich ·
One of the classes of problems dealing with magnetic fields concerns the production of a magnetic field by a current-carrying conductor or by moving charges. It was Oersted who discovered back in the early 1800's that currents produce magnetic effects. The quantitative relationship between the magnetic field strength and the current was later embodied in Ampere's Law, an extension of which made by Maxwell is one of the four basic equations of electromagnetism. PocketLab, used in conjunction...
Blog Post

A Quantitative Study of Helmholtz Coils

Rich ·
These coils come in pairs with the same number of windings of wire on each of the two coils. In "true Helmholtz" configuration: (1) the coils are wired in series with identical currents in the same direction in each coil, and (2) the coils are placed a distance apart that is equal to the radius of each coil. When in this configuration, they produce a very uniform magnetic field that is directed along their common central axis. One of the most common uses for such coils in physics education...
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Re: A Quantitative Study of Helmholtz Coils

Clif ·
Rich- Awesome lab again! You probably noticed that there was change in the field readings along the y and z-axis even though the field should be really uniform in the x-axis between the coils. There are some hard iron and soft iron distortions of the magnetic field because of the coin cell battery, the mounting screws, and errors in the sensor component. We will eventually be able to calibrate the magnetic field readings and compensate for the distortions. Here's some calibration data that I...
Comment

Re: A Quantitative Study of Helmholtz Coils

Rich ·
Clif posted: Rich- Awesome lab again! You probably noticed that there was change in the field readings along the y and z-axis even though the field should be really uniform in the x-axis between the coils. There are some hard iron and soft iron distortions of the magnetic field because of the coin cell battery, the mounting screws, and errors in the sensor component. We will eventually be able to calibrate the magnetic field readings and compensate for the distortions. Here's some...
Blog Post

Magnetic Field on the Axis of a Current Loop

Rich ·
In this lesson students will find that a current-carrying loop can be regarded as a magnetic dipole, as it generates a magnetic field for points on its axis. The figure below shows a diagram and the equation for the magnetic field B. Derivation of this equation requries knowledge of the Biot-Savart Law, calculus and trigonometry. But in this lesson we are interested only in comparing experimental results from PocketLab's magnetometer to the theoretical equation in the figure below. More...
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A PocketLab Experimental Analysis of a Yo-yo

Rich ·
The yo-yo, a toy with an axle connected to two disks and string wound on the axle, has been of fascination to many for centuries. It also offers a perfect opportunity to study angular velocity when a PocketLab has been attached to it. A graph of angular velocity vs. time of a yo-yo will require students to think carefully about the detailed behavior related to its motion. The author worked with a purchased $3 yo-yo, but found the results to be much clearer when attaching a PocketLab to a...
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An Experiment in Rotational Dynamics that Emphasizes the NGSS Science and Engineering Practices

Rich ·
Here is a PocketLab based project that will get your physical science and physics students involved in many of the Next Generation Science Standards, particularly in the NGSS science and engineering practices. Two wheels and a wood axle from the PocketLab Maker Kit are placed on a narrow inclined plane so that the red wheels overhang the sides of the inclined plane and the entire system rolls down on the wood axle without any slipping. When the wheels and axle get near the bottom of the...
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VelocityLab Investigation of Damped Harmonic Motion

Rich ·
This investigation shows how VelocityLab allows for a quick and easy demonstration of damped harmonic motion. The photo below shows the experiment setup as performed by the author. A jellied cranberry sauce can was selected as there is virtually no sloshing of the cranberry sauce as the can oscillates back-and-forth on a curved piece of laminate flooring. The center of the flooring is clamped down to the table with an adjustable wrench. The ends of the laminate flooring are raised a little...
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Re: VelocityLab Investigation of Damped Harmonic Motion

Robby ·
Another great lesson, Rich! Thanks for contributing.
Blog Post

Quantitative Experiment to Determine the Relationship Between a Pendulum's Length and Period

Rich ·
PocketLab is a perfect device for determining the quantitative relationship between the length of a pendulum and its period of oscillation. Pendulums of known lengths were made from balsa wood strips such as those available from Michaels and other hobby stores. The photo below shows six such pendulums of lengths 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 cm alongside a meter stick. The picture shows that PocketLab was taped with double-stick mounting tape to the pendulum whose length is 45 cm. The photo...
Blog Post

Investigating Gay-Lussac's Law and Absolute Zero of Temperature with PocketLab and a Mason Jar

Rich ·
Gay-Lussac's Law states that when the volume of a container of gas is held constant, while the temperature of the gas is increased, then the pressure of the gas will also increase. In other words, pressure is directly proportional to the absolute temperature for a given mass of gas at constant volume. Although this is, strictly speaking, true only for an ideal gas, most gases that surround us behave much like an ideal gas. Even ordinary air, which is a mixture of gases, can behave like an...
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Investigating Boyle's Law with PocketLab

Rich ·
With a pressure sensor built into PocketLab, there must surely be some way to investigate Boyle's Law. This law states that pressure and volume of an ideal gas are inversely proportional to one another provided that the temperature and amount of gas are kept constant within a closed system. What is needed is a closed system that is large enough to hold PocketLab in a way that pressure can be sensed while changing the volume of the enclosed gas (in our case, air). Educational Innovations,...
Blog Post

A Momentum Conservation Experiment for an Inelastic Collision Between Two Carts

Rich ·
Do you have two PocketLab Maker Kit carts, and do you have the free VelocityLab app? Then you are all set to do some experiments in conservation of momentum with PocketLab! This lab discusses how to setup and perform an inelastic collision in which one cart (A) is moving toward another cart (B) that is at rest. When cart A hits cart B, they stick and move off together. The photo below shows the two carts shortly before the collision would occur. PocketLab is mounted on a front wheel of cart...
Blog Post

A Classic Conservation of Momentum Experiment with PocketLab

Rich ·
A well-known conservation of momentum experiment that has been around for many years involves dropping a brick onto a horizontally moving cart. With PocketLab and the VelocityLab app, your students can perform this experiment easily with the cart from the PocketLab Maker Kit and a small block of wood. The snapshot below shows the setup with the author about to drop the block of wood onto the cart coming from the left. A pair of rails, with inside separation just a little larger than the axle...
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